Daily Archives: 08/20/2013

People should not be afraid of their governments. But actually they couldn’t care less.

After all has been said and done over and over, it still took me a fair amount of time to realize what bothered me the most about the NSA affair. Have we been really surprised by what the NSA is doing? Not so much. Is Edward Snowden a hero? Probably, but hero is too much of a militaristic term for my taste. Should we be okay with being spied on? Of course not. Isn’t the data’s content much more important than the meta-data that the NSA is tracking? Not at all. But those who have nothing to hide have nothing to fear? Quite on the contrary.

The idea of spying massively on people is not new. Most classic dystopian stories like 1984 are centered around an omnipresent all-seeing eye kind of state. Even in our own recent history we had governments like the German Democratic Republic in Eastern Germany that massively spied on their people with severe consequences for major parts of the population. So not much about what we’re seeing today is a genuinely new phenomenon.

The graphic novel V for Vendetta also draws the picture of a dystopian state, and the main character that tries to liberate the oppressed people states at some point one of the most iconic sentences about dystopian states: “People should not be afraid of their governments. Governments should be afraid of their people.”

I always liked that sentence, and I still do. Now interestingly, while it should apply to the current situation, it doesn’t. It’s actually the other way around, although the government is spying on the people.

Edward Snowden himself closed with the following words in his famous interview with the Guardian, speaking about what he fears to come out of all of this:

The greatest fear that I have regarding the outcome for America of these disclosures is that nothing will change. People will see in the media all of these disclosures. They’ll know the lengths that the government is going to grant themselves powers unilaterally to create greater control over American society and global society. But they won’t be willing to take the risks necessary to stand up and fight to change things to force their representatives to actually take a stand in their interests.

But people are not only not willing to stand up, they, by and large, couldn’t care less. To me, that’s the most interesting thing about the whole thing. And even I feel fairly detached about the matter. But haven’t I been idealistic once? Haven’t I swore to myself to being one of the first to stand up against any form of state-sanctioned oppression or state-sanctioned undermining of civil rights? And yet, here I am, shrugging my shoulders. Is this what getting old feels like? You give up on your ideals? Maybe. But even if so – sadly enough -, this can only be half the truth.

Because I’m not the only one. There are millions of young people that must have had the same thoughts that I had at that age. But apparently they don’t care either. Is it the openness of the Internet that transformed our innermost perception of privacy and of the importance of privacy? Do we first need to see with our own eyes how our governments might use our own data against us?

I am not trying to be apologetic here. I am just surprised by how less people care, including me.